Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
PNT Thru Hike Planning and Discussion / Re: 2017 PNT Thru-hikers
« Last post by cfreyvt on February 23, 2017, 07:01:49 AM »
Hi all, I'm Christian, and am planning on thru-hiking in 2017. I'm in Nova Scotia, and am looking to head back to the US and enjoy some mountain scenery. I'm planning on starting early July. I would enjoy hearing from you if you are planning on thru-hiking, it would be great to meet people who will be out on the trail.  Click that little mail envelope if you want to reach me!
2
PNT Thru Hike Planning and Discussion / Re: 2017 PNT Thru-hikers
« Last post by Captain Sid on February 18, 2017, 10:14:49 AM »
Hey Folks!

I'm Sid and I'm trying to find some other people to hike at least the beginning section of the PNT in early July.
A little about me: I'm a 27yr. old and will be graduating in June with a degree in outdoor recreation and psych. I'm a wilderness EMT and work as an outdoor guide for Eastern Washington University and also the City of Spokane. This is my first big thru hike and I'm cool hiking solo for part of the adventure but having some chill people to adventure with through the first couple of sections would be nice, generally for safety reasons.
Anyway, please shoot me an email if you'd like a hiking buddy!

Cheers!
3
Although anything is doable, a May trip would be exceptionally difficult, fairly dangerous, and definitely not fun. You'll be much happier if you wait until at least mid-June. From a weather perspective, it doesn't really matter which direction you go - Olympic Park and Glacier Park both remain snow covered until early July.

This graph shows that early May is the maximum snowpack for NW Montana. And by early July the snow is basically gone. You'll be much happier if you wait.
4
PNT Maps, Publications, and Other Resources / Re: PNT Books and Publications
« Last post by chrisx on February 07, 2017, 04:03:53 AM »
Bravo
Are you still writing trail guides?  Does the 2017 Pacific Northwest Trail Digest by Tim Youngbluth, have significant updates over the 2015 edition?
5
I think that's probably too early unless you have experience with and are prepared for technical snow travel. The lowland sections in the Puget Sound and from the western terminus up the Bogachiel River can be hiked year-round but are relatively short, so starting in mid-May and hiking both of them would still leave you with significant snow on the rest of the trail. This kind of flip-flop could potentially be workable in a record-low snow year but this year is going to be normal if not well above average for snow.

If a thru-hike is your goal you'll probably have to adjust your schedules. If you can't get the full time off for a thru there are some spectacular sections you could consider hiking.
6
Yo PNTers! Can I ask for your thoughts...

A friend and I are planning to hit the PNT this summer, and the current plan is to complete the thru-hike, one way or another.

I'm aware that July to Sept is generally seen as the season for doing a thru-hike. However - our schedules mean we are thinking of starting the hike in mid-May, and I guess therefore finishing mid-Julyish. I just wanted to ask whether anyone had any views on whether, given the conditions over this period, this was:

a) a realistic aim;
b) realistic but only if we do something different from the standard A -> B route (e.g. flip-flop or suchlike);
c) laughably unrealistic.

I ask this having done very little research myself as yet; I fully intend to. But I thought it was worth asking the question at the outset just in case this was a complete no-hoper! If so we'll perhaps have to scale down the plan.

Any advice much appreciated. And either way hope to see some of out there later this year!

Thanks,
Sean
7
PNT Thru Hike Planning and Discussion / Re: Technical Aspects of the PNT
« Last post by Dylan Carlson on January 30, 2017, 11:52:03 PM »
^Evan's advice is 100% correct. The biggest obstacles on the PNT are early-season snow and poorly marked trail.

Get familiar with your map and compass (and GPS if you choose to carry one.)
8
PNT Thru Hike Planning and Discussion / Re: Technical Aspects of the PNT
« Last post by Evan on January 30, 2017, 06:56:05 AM »
If you start before July or into July in higher snow years you might have to deal with some snow on the high passes in Montana or if you go eastbound a lot of snow still in the Olympics that traction devices like microspikes might help with or make you feel more comfortable on, but once you get into mid-to-late July most of the serious snow will melt. The North Cascades section is all on trail and if you follow a traditional end-to-end itinerary should be all melted out by the time you get there.

Some of the alternate route choices require some short scrambles but in general it's a non-technical hike. The most important skill is probably navigation, so get some practice if you don't already know your way around a map and compass.
9
PNT Thru Hike Planning and Discussion / Technical Aspects of the PNT
« Last post by Dutt on January 29, 2017, 05:59:01 AM »
Hey all!

I am planning on thru-Hiking the PNT summer of 2018 after I graduate High School. How much technical hiking/climbing is there? Will I need Crampons/ice axe at all? I am a but concerned about the North Cascades section for this.

Thanks!

-Dutt
10
Elwha River road access to Whiskey Bend Trailhead and Olympic Hot Springs trailhead has been re-opened.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/hot-springs-road-reopens-to-glines-canyon-overlook/
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10